‘White Supremacy’ Doesn’t Explain Minorities Attacking Asian Americans

The Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, released findings in March that showed a rise of 149% in reported anti-Asian American hate crimes from 2019 to 2020.

PolitiFact wrote: “The report doesn’t mention former President Donald Trump. However, it does show that Google searches found spikes for racist terms such as ‘China virus’ and ‘Kung Flu’ spiked throughout 2020.”

As to Trump calling the coronavirus the “Chinese virus” or the “Kung Flu,” Asian American Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., said: “It did not help the situation. And frankly, it’s appalling that it’s been allowed … to become this bad. … But we have a long way to go in this country. Asian Americans are still viewed as an ‘other.’”

In short, blame Trump.

But according to Voice of America News: “In New York City, where anti-Asian hate crime soared nearly nine-fold in 2020 over the year before, only two of the 20 people arrested last year in connection with these attacks were white, according to New York Police Department data analyzed by the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. Eleven were African Americans, six were white Hispanics, and one was a Black Hispanic.”

Daily Signal

But not to worry. Professor Jennifer Ho of the University of Colorado at Boulder offers a ready explanation for black hate crimes against Asian Americans: “white superiority.” In an article called “White Supremacy Is the Root of Race-Related Violence in the United States,” Ho writes:

Anti-Asian racism has the same source as anti-Black racism: white supremacy. So when a Black person attacks an Asian person, the encounter is fueled perhaps by racism, but very specifically by white supremacy. White supremacy does not require a white person to perpetuate it. … The dehumanization of Asian people by U.S. society is driven by white supremacy and not by any Black person who may or may not hate Asians.

Behold the power of white supremacy! It programs blacks, according to Ho, to commit hate crimes against Asian Americans. In recent years, there have been approximately 600,000 nonhomicide violent crimes annually between blacks and whites. In about 90% of the cases, it involves a black perpetrator and white victim.

Odd that these omnipotent white supremacists, like Trump, do not invoke their “white supremacy” to program blacks from attacking whites. And why haven’t these white supremacists programmed blacks to vote for Republicans? Maybe they’ll get around to it.

WHEN A HATE CRIME ISN’T REALLY A HATE CRIME: I haven’t yet been able to identify a single anti…

WHEN A HATE CRIME ISN’T REALLY A HATE CRIME:

I haven’t yet been able to identify a single anti-Asian hate crime committed by a Trump supporter, despite the Democrats’ insistence that Trump-loving racists are the main perpetrators. What I did discover, however, was something the media refuses to report. Consistent with the U.S. Bureau of Justice data that was compiled until 2018—Asians are now lumped into the “other” category, a suspicious decision that merits investigation—black males are the main perpetrators of the pandemic’s anti-Asian hate crimes, and there’re videos supporting this claim that the media isn’t going to show you. The media’s problem is that, under the current progressive definition of racism, blacks can’t be racists because, as a group, they have no power. Since reporting that black males are committing race-based violence against another minority group runs counter to this narrative, the media finesses it by not mentioning the race of the assailant if he’s black.

It’s not racist to point out who’s committing these hate crimes—data can’t be racist. Anti-Asian hate crimes were up by about 150 percent in 2020, so it’s a serious problem that needs to be addressed head-on, not danced around. But what we’ll get are more articles like the one Yahoo News ran in February, “Anti-Asian violence has been rampant. Here’s why it’s not always a ’hate crime.’” Suddenly, the media wants to make sure we don’t exaggerate a specific hate crime problem. The authors of the piece say it’s important to use “precise, accurate language in discussing” anti-Asian violence. In other words, use precisely the opposite sort of language progressives use when attributing an incident to “white supremacy.”

Source: WHEN A HATE CRIME ISN’T REALLY A HATE CRIME: I haven’t yet been able to identify a single anti…

Dems Peddling False Narrative Of Republican Anti-Asian American Racism

Since Donald Trump’s share of the Asian-American vote rose from 29% in 2016 to 34% in 2020, the Democrats and their media allies are doing their best to create a sense of racial victimization among Asian-Americans and blame it on Donald Trump.

….

The media hysterically reports a 150% increase in hate crimes against Asian-Americans during the pandemic. But read the fine print. The actual number of such crimes is minor. New York City had 28, Boston 14 and Los Angeles 15. And the FBI defines hate crimes very broadly to include vandalism and any “criminal offense against a person or propter motivated by an offender’s bias…”

….

The Biden Justice Department is clearly putting the rights of Asian American applicants below those of African-Americans and other minorities. With the marvelous success-orientation of a great many young Asian-Americans, it is of far greater moment whether their racial heritage will bar their way into top quality schools than whether the President accuses China of starting the pandemic.

Dick Morris.com

Police Say Suspected Antifa Hit-Man Stalked Pro-Trump Victim Before Portland Murder

Michael Forest Reinoehl, a self-described anti-fascist who said he provided security for Portland racial justice protests, appears to have targeted a participant in a pro-Trump rally, emerging from an alcove of a parking garage before firing two gunshots, one that hit the man’s bear spray can and the other that proved fatal, according to a police affidavit unsealed Friday.

Police found a single Winchester .380-caliber bullet casing on the street, a metal canister of “Bear Attack Detector” that had a “large defect” in it and a collapsible metal baton just north of Aaron “Jay” Danielson’s body, a detective said in the affidavit.

….

Reinoehl is seen hiding in an alcove of the garage and reaching into a pouch or waistband as Danielson and a friend, Chandler Pappas, walk south on Third Avenue.

Homicide Detective Rico Beniga wrote that Reinoehl “conceals himself, waits and watches” as Danielson and Pappas pass him.

After the two men go by, Reinoehl followed them, walking west across the street moments before the gunshots were fired, police said.

Investigators said it appeared as if Reinoehl stood holding his gun with both hands extended when he fired. After the shots, his right hand remained extended and pointed at Danielson before he turned to run away, police said.

Source: Police Say Suspected Antifa Hit-Man Stalked Pro-Trump Victim Before Portland Murder

Analysis: Trump rallies did not lead to an increase in hate crimes

Back in March, the Washington Post published a piece by three Texas A&M professors who had produced a paper titled “The Trump Effect: How 2016 Campaign Rallies Explain Spikes in Hate .” The paper, which hadn’t been published or peer-reviewed, claimed there was a 226 percent jump in hate crimes in counties that hosted a Trump rally.

Source: Analysis: Trump rallies did not lead to an increase in hate crimes

SPLC is Dysfunctional


But the organization has long been dysfunctional in even deeper ways, and the story of Dees and the SPLC is useful for illustrating some of the worst and most hypocritical tendencies in American liberalism. If we understand the full extent of what went wrong in this organization, we’ll better understand the ways in which a shallow “politics of spectacle” can take hold, and see the kinds of practices that need to be categorically rejected in the pursuit of progressive change.


The Southern Poverty Law Center perfectly shows social change done wrong. It was a top-down organization controlled by an incompetent and venal leadership.* It was hypocritical in the extreme, preaching anti-racism while fostering a racist internal culture and being led by men whose own commitment to equality was questionable. It didn’t care about listening to and incorporating the viewpoints of the people it was supposed to serve. It was obscenely rich in a time of terrible poverty, and squandered much its considerable wealth. Finally, it picked the wrong political targets, and focused on symbolic over substantive change. Each of these practices goes beyond the SPLC, and is endemic to a certain kind of “elite liberalism” that desires “progress” without sacrifice. It is the kind of liberalism recognized by Phil Ochs in 1966, and its chief characteristics are a deep hypocrisy and a lack of willingness to seriously challenge the status quo.


THE SOUTHERN POVERTY LAW CENTER IS EVERYTHING THAT’S WRONG WITH LIBERALISM


What the SPLC doesn’t do with its money is a problem. But there is also a problem with what it does do. The story here has been told many times: After beginning as something vaguely resembling a “poverty law” firm in the ’70s, and winning a number of important anti-discrimination fights, the SPLC turned much of its attention to going after “hate groups.” It pursued the Ku Klux Klan in court on behalf of its victims, winning large judgments. Over time, it began to track “hate” across the country, and it now has a 15-person staff producing “intelligence reports” on hate groups.
The SPLC’s shift toward focusing on hate groups was controversial within the organization. Some felt that it would make sense to focus on more systemic problems, like mass incarceration, rather than targeting (usually small) far-right fringe groups. But Dees saw an opportunity for both publicity and fundraising, and he was right. The organization mostly stopped taking death penalty cases (too controversial with donors) and instead focused on neo-Nazis, a group that pretty much everyone despises.
The SPLC devotes a phenomenal amount of effort to chronicling “hate” across the country. Its quarterly “Intelligence Report,” a beautifully-produced glossy magazine about hate groups, is mailed out by the hundreds of thousands. It writes long profiles of hate figures documenting their every bigoted utterance, and keeps tabs on hate groups through its signature “Hate Map.”
There has long been controversy over the SPLC’s “hate watch” activities. Conservatives are constantly complaining that they have been unfairly labeled racists, with mainstream conservative organizations like the Family Research Council landing themselves on the SPLC list. When Maajid Nawaz, a controversial critic of Islamism, was labeled an anti-Muslim extremist by the SPLC, he sued and received a $3 million settlement, plus an apology. One problem here is that the definition of “hate” is very unclear. It supposedly means having “beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people,” but in that case I’m a member of a hate group myself, since I despise bourgeois liberals. The SPLC includes “black nationalism” on its list of hate categories, which means that every time it reports the number of hate groups in America it is including the “New Black Panther Party” (and doing precisely what FOX News did in its own disgraceful reporting on the supposed threat posed by roving gangs of New Black Panthers).
The biggest problem with the hate map, though, is that it’s an outright fraud. I don’t use that term casually. I mean, the whole thing is a willful deception designed to scare older liberals into writing checks to the SPLC. The SPLC reported this year that the number of hate groups in the country is at a “record high,” that it is the “fourth straight year” of hate group growth, and that this growth coincides with Donald Trump’s rise to power. There are now a whopping 1,020 hate groups around the country. America is teeming with hate.

ibid


This whole SPLC set-up strikes me as fraudulent in the extreme. I don’t know how else to describe it. They have a team of people investigating these groups. They have to know that they’re inflating the danger. They know that when they report “over 1,000” hate groups in America, they’ve deliberately excluded membership numbers in order to sound as scary as possible. They’re perpetrating a deception, because they don’t want you to know that groups like the “Asatru Folk Assembly” are no political threat. The SPLC has continuously sent out terrifying lies to make old people part with their money. They’ve become fantastically wealthy from telling people that individual kooks in Kennesaw are “hate groups” on the march. And they’ve done far less with the money they receive than any other comparable civil rights group will do. To me, this is a scam bordering on criminal mail fraud. If you tell people things that aren’t true so that you can take their money and then not use that money for the thing you said you would use it for, you’re a fraudster. I hestitate to say that because I know lots of great people who have worked at the SPLC, and good work is done there. But the Morris Dees model is a scam: It finds as much “hate” as possible in order to make as much money as possible.
If you trawl through the Hate Map for a little while like I did, you may also feel uncomfortable for another reason. Most of the people they’re listing as threats seem as if they are poor and unschooled. I bet if you compared the average annual salary of the SPLC staff to the average salary of the people in these hate groups, you’d find a massive class divide. Whether it’s poor Black people joining weird sects like the United Nuwaupians, or poor white people getting together and calling themselves things like the “Folkgard of Holda & Odin,” these are people on society’s margins. A lot of this seems to be educated liberals having contempt for and fear of angry rednecks.
This is not to say that neo-Nazis aren’t fucking terrifying, or that they don’t pose any threat. The Daily Stormer is a real thing, and there is a lot of dangerous white supremacist nonsense believed by a lot of people. But the “hate” focus is all wrong: The biggest threats to people of color do not come from those who “hate” them, but from those (like the contemporary Republican Party) who are totally indifferent to whether they live or die. This is the frightening thing about contemporary racism: It does not come waving the Confederate flag, it comes waving the American flag.

Here we see what appear to be anti-Republican bona-fides.

The Southern Poverty Law Center Is Both a Terrible Place to Work and a Place That Does Terrible Work

Controversy has struck the Southern Poverty Law Center, the formidable progressive law firm best known for tracking hate groups in the U.S. Co-founder Morris Dees, President Richard Cohen, and other top executives are exiting the organization amidst a staff uprising over alleged sexual and racial harassment in the work place.

Source: The Southern Poverty Law Center Is Both a Terrible Place to Work and a Place That Does Terrible Work

What Fake Hate Crimes Reveal About the Left’s Bubble – Acculturated

Source: What Fake Hate Crimes Reveal About the Left’s Bubble – Acculturated

But we live in a society where moving away is no longer an option. We’ve been pushed into a small world, where we can either get along or create our own ecosystems, which, as many observers have noted, have come to resemble insular “bubbles.” Unable to compromise, we’ve chosen to draw into ourselves until we can no longer live in a community.

When a society starts to behave like this, people like Bass or the student at University of Michigan’s actions become plausible. They’re not crazy; they’re just protecting their self-contained world against the supposed hatred of the outside. Self-preservation becomes paramount. And if that means getting rid of their neighbors by blaming them for the poison they threw on their own plants, then so be it. In a world of one, the only integrity worth maintaining is autonomy.

The tendency for humans to build self-centered worlds is as old as pride itself. Especially since the Trump election—an unpleasant reality for many Americans—half of the country seems to be terrified of anything that might threaten their personal Xanadus. Cries of “Fake news!” and “Resist!” and “Not my president!” are oddly reassuring to those who make them, of course, giving them a sense of camaraderie and purpose, but they also highlight how displaced from each other we have become.
Dislocating ourselves won’t work in the long run—we’re made to love each other, not ourselves. As this rash of fake hate crimes shows, the more we try to double-down on identity politics and protect ourselves strictly as individuals, the less capable we will be of functioning as a society.