Fantasy world economics 101: Introduction

Source: Fantasy world economics 101: Introduction

I got to thinking about economics in a Fantasy world, particularly my RPG world, after someone posed the question of why there would be beggars in a Dungeons and Dragons game.

The basic answer is because that’s the best way they have of making a living.

But why would that be anyone’s best choice?

Anyone with a crippling injury can be healed by magic. But if magic is rare and expensive, many people won’t be.

In a world where 90% or more of all tasks have to be done by muscle power, someone who lacks muscle power won’t be able to do useful work. Technology isn’t around to ease burdens, and while magic can take the place of technology, how prevalent is durable magic in the world?

This may be the beginning of a series.

Legal Systems Very Different From Ours

Source: David Friedman (Son of Milton Friedman)

A discussion of legal systems very different from the U.S. legal system. This is of interest to me as a politics geek, and also as a Dungeons and Dragons player.

To give you a quick idea of what’s there, here is the table of contents:

Introduction

1.      Imperial Chinese Law
2.      Romani Law
3.      The Amish
4.      Jewish Law
5.      Islamic Law
6.      When God is the Legislator.
7.      Pirate Law
8.      Prisoners’ Law
9.      Student Law [Not yet in]
10.    Embedded and Polylegal Systems
11.    Saga-Period Iceland
12.    Somali Law
13.    Early Irish Law
14.    Comanche, Kiowa and Cheyenne: The Plains Indians
15.    Feud Law
16.    England in the Eighteenth Century
17.    Athenian Law: The Work of a Mad Economist
18.    Enforcing Rules
19.    The Problem of Error
20.    Making Law
21.    Guarding the Guardians
22.    Ideas We Can Use