CRT Article of Faith: Blacks Are Picked On By Police

The high rates of arrest, conviction, and imprisonment of black people, are part of systemic racism.

Race and Ethnicity of Violent Crime Offenders and Arrestees, 2018 compares race of offenders from Uniform Crime Reports and victim reports from NCVS to see if police charge blacks disproportionately to their involvement in violent crimes.  The answer is that Hispanics seem to be disproportionately arrested but white and black offenders are charged at rates comparable to victim reporting.  Table 3.

Source: Clayton Cramer

Book Review: ‘Woke Racism’ by John McWhorter

This eloquent manifesto is Mr. McWhorter’s 22nd book, a majority of those on the subject of linguistics. His is a split personality: A linguist in his day job as a professor at Columbia University (specializing in creoles, particularly the Saramaccan language in Suriname), he’s also an outspoken commentator on race whenever the national mood requires it. As Mr. McWhorter’s thinking on race is in conflict with that of the black American political mainstream, he’s often miscast as a black conservative by glib taxonomists. But he’s careful to point out that he wasn’t “thinking of right-wing America as my audience,” even as he acknowledges that many liberal readers will think him “traitorous” for writing this book.

Wall Street Journal

Mr. McWhorter’s targets in “Woke Racism” are antiracist crusaders whom he calls the Elect—borrowing a term used by the essayist Joseph Bottum in his book “An Anxious Age” (2014). Mr. McWhorter chooses not to call these people Social Justice Warriors or Inquisitors, deeming those labels “unsuitably dismissive” and “mean,” respectively. He’s not the first to trace the “rootstock” of their ideology to critical race theory. This is a once-fringe belief, now muscling its way into mainstream thought, that every individual’s fate is determined by racial “hierarchy” and power. The theory contends, writes Mr. McWhorter, that a nonwhite in America is “akin to the captive oarsman slave straining belowdecks in chains.

”The Elect, Mr. McWhorter notes, pursue a proselytizing brand of antiracism that has had a particularly harmful effect on academic inquiry, “sometimes strangling it like kudzu.” Bestselling books like Robin DiAngelo’s “White Fragility”—which flagellates white people for their incurable racism—and Ibram X. Kendi’s “How to Be an Antiracist” are the gospels of the antiracist left.

The Elect have a weapon in their arsenal that lends them outsize power. As a result of the “genuine and invaluable change” that has occurred in the modern white American since the Civil Rights movement, “being called a racist is all but equivalent to being called a pedophile.” Those who police our minds for racism believe that Americans who don’t fight to overturn “the systemic pervasiveness of white supremacy” must be regarded as racist themselves. The world of the Elect is “Manichaean,” its fervor “absolutist.”

The book finishes with a robust marine metaphor. Mr. McWhorter suggests that the woke be dealt with the way some swimmers deal with sharks. “You can make a shark approaching you go away by bopping it on the nose,” he writes. The Elect are like sharks. They need to be bopped on the nose.

Thomas Sowell vs. Critical Race Theory

Long before the new generation of race hucksters came along, Thomas Sowell offered pre-buttals to their arguments.

Intellectuals give people who have the handicap of poverty the further handicap of a sense of victimhood,” wrote Thomas Sowell, who himself grew up in poverty and was orphaned in early childhood. Continuing the thought in Intellectuals and Society (2010), he reflected on the damage done by our supposedly smartest thinkers

Source: Thomas Sowell vs. Critical Race Theory

“When you shame white children, you’re actually also shaming black children”

I answered 5 BIG Questions for Campus Reform: “because you’re sending a message to them that somehow in our society they start out less equal, that somehow in our society they don’t have a fair shot, that somehow in our society hard work and dedication is not going to pay off because there’s this systemically racist system that is putting them down…. Their fate in life is to be oppressed. I think that’s about as bad as you can get.”

Source: “When you shame white children, you’re actually also shaming black children”

 

CRT Falls Apart When You Look at Afghanistan

The crisis unfolding in Afghanistan makes a compelling case that a central contention of critical race theory is fatally flawed.

….

The absence of the U.S. military has led to vile and almost unimaginable levels of evil and suffering.

This would come as a surprise to promulgators of critical race theory. CRT-inspired teachings claim that America is fundamentally racist. Our founding ideals — that all men are created equal and have unalienable rights — were a façade used to disguise the country’s inherent white supremacy.

“Racism is a system infused across society,” Robin DeAngelo, author of “White Fragility,” claims.

That foundational belief leads to some radical claims. The United States uses “race to establish and justify systems of power, privilege, disenfranchisement and oppression,” which gives “privileges to white people resulting in disadvantages to people of color,” a Bank of America training memo stated. Journalist Christopher Rufo released the training materials.

“At some point we are going to have to stop denying that we have metastatic racism,” Ibram X. Kendi, author of “How to Be an Antiracist,” said in a 2019 speech. “Because if you didn’t already know, it is literally killing America. It is literally killing this world.” The solution, Kendi contends, is to change the “very underpinnings and structures and systems of this country.”

What happened in Afghanistan over the past few weeks was in many ways an ideal scenario for testing the CRT hypothesis. The United States quickly went from an established military presence to having virtually no influence in the country. Even our embassy has been overrun. If U.S. racism is “literally killing this world” as CRT-inspired advocates claim, the U.S. withdrawal should have advanced human flourishing.

Instead, the Taliban filled the power vacuum — creating a government characterized by overt structural oppression enforced by large doses of violence.

This is what CRT gets wrong. The United States isn’t uniquely evil. Evil has been the norm throughout human history. People around the world have slaughtered and enslaved each other for thousands of years in pursuit of power and money.

What’s unique is a country that eliminated slavery because it violated its principles. What’s unique is a country that eventually offered full civil rights to women and minorities in pursuit of those ideals. What’s unique is a superpower that could conquer the world — and didn’t — because it believes in liberty.

Afghans are risking their lives and handing their children over fences for the chance of living under the American institutions and ideals that CRT seeks to destroy.

Source: CRT Falls Apart When You Look at Afghanistan

“Lived Experience”

I need to save this for the next “discussion” about “white privilege”.

This is one of those phrases out of the critical racism theory cult.  It means that my personal experience (which is subjective, perhaps improved by trauma or intentional exaggeration to meet the needs of the moment) take precedence over any objective measurements (what is the race distribution of people killed by police officers?)  My “lived experience” trumps data, logic, everything.

My “lived experience” is that growing up poor and white was hard.  I went to school with black kids from middle class homes that I could only envy.  I experienced a robbery that in my perception (all that matters, right?) was driven by race, and relied on race (robber pointing to three much older and larger blacks and identifying them as “my brothers” to insure compliance) to make it happen.  In the 1970s, I saw a lot of racism in hiring.  (I was an employment agent.)  My lived experience has been that hard work and character  are rewarded with family stability and wealth.

That’s my “lived experience”: if you disagree, you are a racist.

Source: “Lived Experience”

Two CRT links

It’s been very hard to pin down just what Critical Race Theory actually is. A lot of the proposed definitions and descriptions seem to be formulated by people with axes to grind, and the rest seem flexible enough that they can be stretched to include or exclude anything desired. Trying to decide whether CRT is being taught (or used) in a school is like trying to nail Kool-Aid to a wall.

These may be useful toward a serious understanding.

First, William Galston writes,

Critical race theory is an explicitly left-wing movement inspired by the thinking of an Italian neo-Marxist, Antonio Gramsci. Against classic Marxism, for which material conditions are primary, Gramsci (1891-1937) focused on “hegemony”—the system of beliefs that “reinforces existing social arrangements and convinces the dominated classes that the existing order is inevitable,” as Ms. Crenshaw puts it.

Noteworthy because Galston is center-left. He is burning some bridges here.

Helen Pluckrose writes,

Rather than quibbling over whether what critics are criticising is really the theories that emerged in legal studies from the 1970s, let’s address the reality of what critical theories of race look like right now and how they are impacting real people of all races.

In much of the essay, Pluckrose really gets into the theoretical weeds, even though she points out that a different CRT has been popularized than what was created in academia. This reminds me of Keynesian economics in grad school, where there were all sorts of esoteric discussions of what Keynes really meant and what Keynesian economics ought to be. Meanwhile, what took hold in the press and in public policy is what I call “folk” Keynesianism, which is nothing more than “spending creates jobs, and jobs create spending.” The academic arguments matter only to the academics.

Similarly, I expect that academic discussions of critical race theory no longer affect “folk” critical race theory, or FCRT, if you will. FCRT is what K-12 teachers and journalists carry with them. I think it includes a belief in the moral inferiority of white males. It includes a belief that “privilege” is a very important concept. I think it includes some Puritan sensibilities, particularly an unforgiving stance regarding heretics. But these are tentative thoughts about FCRT. I do not feel confident that I have it pinned down yet.

Source: Two CRT links

“The likelihood that you’re going to have a book in kindergarten or third grade called ‘Critical Race Theory’ is extremely remote. That is not what happens.”

My appearance on Point of View with Chris Berg: “What happens is they take the concepts of Critical Race Theory, and they maybe call it something else …. But the concepts are the same, which is that the country, the nation is systemically racist.

Source: “The likelihood that you’re going to have a book in kindergarten or third grade called ‘Critical Race Theory’ is extremely remote. That is not what happens.”

Mandatory CRT-Based Program Coming to a School…

GET YOUR KIDS OUT OF PUBLIC INDOCTRINATION CENTERS: Mandatory CRT-Based Program Coming to a School Near You. Olly olly oxen free ! Also: Commies, leave the kids alone!

….

As I started to evangelize on this message, I realized that I would actually have to read the damn books if I wanted to have any credibility.  I couldn’t just read the snippets and sound-bites.  Just in the forward section of Critical Race Theory, an Introduction, was the most mind-blowing understanding of how racist this construct was:

“None of my professors talked about race or ethnicity; it was apparently irrelevant to the law. None of my professors in the first year talked about feminism or the concerns of women, either. These concerns were also, apparently, irrelevant. Nowhere, in fact, did the cases and materials we read address concerns of group inequality, sexual difference, or cultural identity. There was only one Law, a law that in its universal majesty applied to everyone without regard to race, color, gender, or creed.”

All I could think was “isn’t that what the Law SHOULD do???”

But no, CRT proponents seriously believe we need to parcel everyone out into little sub groups and attach a oppressor/victim status to each of them.  Which child is going to be better off for this kind of thinking?  It’s child abuse on either side!  The purpose of CRT learning is to inflict equity.  It is NOT about equality of opportunity.

Source: GET YOUR KIDS OUT OF PUBLIC INDOCTRINATION CENTERS: Mandatory CRT-Based Program Coming to a School…