The racism of “white privilege”

I suppose we can start with the notion that beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and life choices are linked with race.

 

“White Privilege” Is A Racist Concept, And Trying To Teach It Is A Racist Act

As I was writing an article earlier about a PTA at a North Carolina elementary school attempting to teach parents and kids about the concept of “white privilege,” it occurred to me that the true evil behind the concept and the spread of it isn’t often talked about.

The concept of “white privilege” is that because someone is born with white skin, they have it far easier in society than those with darker skin. While I don’t at all deny that other racial communities have their own problems, to dismiss the fact that whiteness comes with fewer problems is an asinine concept.

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In order to arrive at the belief that “white privilege” is real, you first have to declare that every person with a certain level of melanin all lead similar lives. Roll around your nearest city for more than two hours and you’ll immediately find that this idea is demonstrably false. You’ll find everyone from homeless, to minimum wage workers, to middle management, all the way up to sharply dressed businessmen who have offices on higher floors.

The presence of white homeless, or minimum wage individuals should be enough to squash many a point in the “white privilege” theory. The presence of minorities in high positions should as well, but regardless of this obvious fact the theory continues to thrive despite the presence of white people not getting the piles of cash they’re alleged to receive so easily. Assuming that every white person is well off is racist in itself. It’s a stereotype on par with “every Asian knows karate.”

Assuming that a person only received a job position, had an easier time with police, or benefited from a situation in some way completely dismisses that person’s hard work and qualifications, or their demeanor during the traffic stop, or their personal wisdom in making right choices. Automatically pointing to the fact that they’re white and thus came out on top dismisses the person. That IS racist.

As a kid, I was taught to dismiss a person’s a skin color in terms of how I viewed their quality. Yes, they were black. Yes, their life experiences are different from mine, but I was taught that despite differences in our skin color, it was not fair to judge someone’s worth based on their skin’s level of melanin.

But the concept of “white privilege” attempts to destroy this perfectly solid line of reasoning. It urges people to believe that worth is based on skin color, and it also teaches that white people are worth more. The proof is in the words of black North Carolinian Amber Pabon’s 8-year-old child when he asked her if white people were better than him after receiving a handout about “white privilege” from his school.

While the social justice community that tries to spread the idea of “white privilege” believes that generating the concept will open up society’s eyes, and make white people aware, what it’s really doing is fomenting division.

Attaching yourself and others to the belief that being black will result in little to no advancement due to your skin color, while white people will only succeed because of theirs only has succeeded in generating indignance, and fosters an atmosphere of “us vs. them.” It makes one a villain, and one a victim.

And so, “white privilege” paints white people as a horrible race that does much to keep others down, when in fact they’re just people trying to go about their everyday lives like everyone else with varied examples of success and failure. Attempting to teach this concept of “white privilege” is the spread of racism.

Thus, attempting to teach and convince others of the idea of “white privilege” is a racist act.

If we’re going to fix race relations, we first have to get rid of the idea that a skin color controls your destiny, and not the individual’s drive to improve their standing. It’s embracing the fact that yes, society and your surroundings do have a massive effect on how you’re viewed or treated, but that improving things starts with a will to do so, not the color of your skin.

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